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Differences – BOMA 2010 to 2017

9 Jan

The BOMA 2017 Office Standard was released in October 2017 and represents a significant leap forward for the standard. Several of the changes focus on the formatting of the document itself, which is designed to be easily digested. One of the goals was to make this standard more approachable to owners, property managers and brokers who might not need to apply the standard, but do need to understand it on a cursory level. The changes made with the general organization, copy and illustrations lends itself well to achieving this goal. However, the document remains primarily a technical manual, focused on how to apply the office standard accurately, consistently and objectively.

BOMA 2017 removes the Public Pedestrian Thoroughfare Boundary Condition. In previous versions of the standard, ground floor tenants with street frontage were measured to the outer surface of exterior walls, rather than the inside finished surface. The removal of this condition results in slightly reduced rentable areas, but this was a confusing nuance of the standard and BOMA decided for overall consistency, that all tenant spaces should be measured the same.

Major Vertical Penetrations are no longer excluded from rentable area at their lowest level in 2017. Previously, this rule was already applied to vertical service areas, such as pipe and mechanical shafts, but not to vertical circulation areas, such as stairwells and elevator shafts. It was confusing to apply two different rules to Major Vertical Penetrations. This change results in higher rentable areas but there is now one cohesive rule that respects one of the most basic principles of the standard – that floor space is rentable area and openings in the floor are not.

BOMA 2017 also finally includes an official methodology of calculating amenity and service areas that are in use by specific groups of occupants, rather than simply allocating such spaces to an entire floor or to the entire building. BOMA calls this Inter-Building Area and it really allows for a great level of customization to the standard. It helps to ensure that Tenants will not pay for space in the building that they do not derive a benefit from and it can also be applied across buildings in an office complex. This doesn’t have any impact on the total rentable area of a building, but it does distribute proportionately allocated areas more fairly.

Another key change made was to allow capped load factors to be applied on an occupant-by-occupant basis rather than a floor-by-floor basis. This will go a long way in helping landlords and tenants negotiate leases appropriate to the market at any given time, while still adhering to the standard.

Finally, the BOMA Office Standard is now compatible with the International Property Measurement Standards or IPMS. IPMS is an international committee developing a full suite of measurement standards focused on producing a consistent measurement methodology for building valuations across international markets. BOMA’s direct compatibility with IPMS will enhance its usefulness and further position BOMA as the de-facto standard to use internationally.

Making the standard compatible with IPMS had its complications, but there is a certain synergy to its timing. In particular, it really made BOMA reevaluate unenclosed exterior areas and consider the real world changes occurring in the industry. In today’s market, owners and tenants are demanding that their buildings include well-appointed exterior amenities where occupants can work or refresh in a finished outdoor environment. The standard needed to adapt to these changes in the marketplace and so the standard will allow balconies, covered galleries and rooftop patios to be included as rentable area in certain conditions.

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IPMS 2 at a glance

4 Jan

IPMS 2 – Office can be used by people such as asset managers, brokers, cost consultants, facility managers, occupiers, owners, property managers, researchers and valuers. The component areas in IPMS 2 – Office enable users and service providers to make direct floor space comparisons between data from different market practices.

IPMS 2IPMS 2 – Office is the sum of the areas of each floor level of an office building measured to the internal dominant face and reported on a component-by-component basis for each floor of a building. In many markets, but not universally, this is known as gross internal area.

IPMS 2 at a glance

  • It is equivalent to the old measurement of gross internal area
  • It is only used for the measurement of offices
  • It is used for measuring the internal area of a building, including internal walls and columns (both were previously excluded from gross internal area)
  • IPMS 2 can be used by parties including asset managers, brokers, cost consultants, facility managers, occupiers, owners, property managers, researchers and valuers
  • It includes and excludes certain areas  from the measurement (see below)
  • It also includes some measurements that must be stated separately (balconies, covered galleries, rooftop spaces and two new concepts for members: component areas and internal dominant face).

Inclusions

IPMS 2 – Office includes all areas including internal walls, columns and enclosed walkways or passages between separate buildings, available for direct or indirect use. Covered void areas such as atria are only included at their lowest floor level.

Exclusions

Measurement for IPMS 2 – Office is not to include the area of open light wells or upper level voids of an atrium, but may state separately, if measured, areas which are not fully enclosed, such as balconies, covered galleries, and generally accessible rooftop terraces. Patios and decks at ground level, external car parking, equipment yards, cooling equipment and refuse areas.

IPMS 2

IPMS 3 at a glance

4 Jan

IPMS 3 – Office is used by people such as agents and occupiers, asset managers, facility managers, property managers, researchers and valuers.

IPMS 3IPMS 3 – Office is the floor area available on an exclusive basis to an occupier, but excluding standard facilities and shared circulation areas, and calculated on an occupier-by-occupier or floor-by-floor basis for each building.

IPMS 3 at a glance

  • It is equivalent to the old measurement of net internal area and deals with those parts occupied by a tenant
  • It can only be used for the measurement of offices
  • IPMS 3 is used for measuring the internal area of a building in exclusive occupation, including internal walls and columns (previously excluded from net internal area)
  • It can be used by parties such as agents, occupiers, asset managers, facility managers, property managers, researchers and valuers
  • Standard facilities are included and excluded from the measurement (see below)
  • It also includes some measurements that must be stated separately (balconies, covered galleries, rooftop terraces) as well as a new concept for members: internal dominant face.

Inclusions

All internal walls and columns within an occupant’s exclusive area are included within IPMS 3 – Office. The floor area is taken to the internal dominant face and, where there is a common wall with an adjacent tenant, to the centre-line of the common wall.

Exclusions

Standard facilities are those parts of a building that would provide shared or common facilities that typically do not change over time. Standard facilities may vary from floor-to-floor and will also vary according to how the building is occupied.

IPMS 3

Repost from:

Alexander Aronsohn FRICS

Director of Technical International Standards (RICS)